Contraception pill

Political opposition preventing development of sex contraceptive pill

By: Information Daily Staff Writer
Published: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - 12:38 GMT Jump to Comments

Researchers have warned that political opposition is the main barrier in developing post sex contraception for women.

Research published in the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care has found that a contraceptive pill used after sex would be welcomed by many women.

Currently, emergency contraceptive pills can be used within 72 hours of sex, but post fertilisation contraception could be used after a longer period than just three days.

This form of contraception could potentially be taken just once in the monthly menstrual cycle, regardless of how many times a woman had sex before taking it.

The post fertilisation method would eliminate the logistical challenge of obtaining contraception before having sex, which can often be daunting for both men and women.

Currently, it is unclear whether available drugs would work effectively in this way, and US and Swedish specialists in reproductive health conclude that more research is required.

Given the rapid improvements made in the understanding of reproductive physiology, is it likely that the development of such a drug would ultimately be successful. Although multidisciplinary research may be needed to help define the best options, promising compounds and the necessary pharmaceutical knowledge do exist.

The greatest challenge to developing these contraceptives, however, will be political opposition. In the UK and the US, governments define the start of pregnancy as the implantation of the fertilised egg, and interruption afterwards is classified as abortion under current laws.

Although abortion is now legal in many countries around the world, effective legislative reform is still required to ensure the reproductive health of women.

Evidence from surveys suggests that, on the whole, women back the idea of post fertilisation contraception. All that is lacking is the funding to kick start research in this developing area of reproductive health care.

In order to meet the challenge of an increasingly complicated world, women deserve all possible options for controlling and preserving their reproductive health, the report concluded.

In an accompanying podcast, lead author of the report Elizabeth Raymond acknowledges the need to win over policy makers. She also said that specialists working in family planning have their part to play in the development of this new type of contraception.

She said, “We need to stop extolling pre-fertilisation contraception as a good thing, because it implies that something that works after fertilisation is bad. We have to stop doing that.

“[Post-fertilisation] contraception doesn’t have to be acceptable to every woman", she adds. "No method is acceptable to every woman now.”

Comments

Latest

As the Government promises GP practices open seven days a week, 12 hours a day, by 2020, RealityBites discusses…

Open data policies need to become as commonplace as health and safety policies. Opening up needs champions in…

As the recession took hold the public sector was quick to embrace online travel booking. The private sector is…

With optimism slowly but surely returning to the UK economy, many of those organisations that made significant…

English City regions want some of what Scotland's having. Devo Manchester is pushing to the head of the queue.…

The funding crisis in the NHS means we must start a debate on how we can link choices we make to look after our…

Last week’s Scottish independence NO vote brought wider English regional devolution two steps closer. Suppliers…

Every weekday Public Service Intelligence publishes a subscription service focussing on local council news and…

Do you do digital? Take the test

The Information Daily is collaborating with Socitm to research organisations' commitment to and capability for a digital future.

Take the test

View Results

If you have already taken the test, you may view the latest detailed results by entering your email address below


Headline results so far: Results from 108 users

Corporate commitment: 46%
0%
100%
50%
Digital capability: 53%
0%
100%
50%

In January this year, Coverity submitted a series of freedom of information (FOI) requests to all the UK’s…

Margaret Thatcher and Che Guevara would have made an unlikely alliance. But that’s what happened earlier…

Every weekday Public Service Intelligence publishes a subscription service focussing on local council news and…

Every medical professional in the UK, to one degree or another, today faces the challenge of managing a growing…