Homelessness

Homelessness and the housing crisis: The reality

By: Rachel Coffey, Research Manager for umbrella body Homeless Link
Published: Friday, September 6, 2013 - 13:28 GMT Jump to Comments

You’re staying with friends but they need the spare room back and ask you to leave. Your tenancy comes to an end and the landlord kicks you out. Your relationship breaks down and you have to leave home.

There is a good chance that at least one of these has happened to you, or someone you know, at some point. Thankfully, most of us can rely on the support of friends and family to help us back on our feet and support us to move forward with our lives. 

But what if you don’t have that safety net? 

According to new figures on homelessness released this week by the Department for Communities and Local Government, these are the three most common triggers that lead people into homelessness, accounting for 73 per cent of those given help by their council.   

Over 28,000 households asked for help with homelessness between April and June 2013. What happened to them?

About half – nearly 13,500 households – were accepted as needing help with housing. Of this number, three-quarters (73 per cent) had dependent children or someone in the household who was pregnant.  15 per cent (2,080) were vulnerable through physical disability or mental illness.  More than 1 in 4 (3,840) were headed by someone under 25. 

Nearly 4,000 people were made homeless when their relatives or friends could no longer accommodate them (29 per cent). Over a quarter (3,580) of households became homeless when their tenancy came to an end – a figure that has shot up by 68 per cent over the past two years.  2,170 were made homeless when a relationship with a partner broke down (16 per cent), of which over two-thirds involved violence. 

For most households ‘accepted’ (60 per cent), this now means living in temporary housing like B&Bs, hostels or private flats until they can get a secure place to call their home. At the end of June there were 56,210 people in this situation, nearly half of whom (43 per cent) were single women with young children. Of those who moved on from temporary accommodation, most (66 per cent) stayed for less than six months, and three-quarters (73 per cent) accepted a flat from the council or housing association. 

There is, however, another side to this story as more than half (52 per cent) of those approaching their council for help were not accepted. Why were so many turned down?

A quarter were considered ‘not homeless’ (26 per cent). This group may contain those who do have accommodation but still feel they need help moving on due to, for example, living in overcrowded, poor conditions that are damaging their health. 

2,140 were turned away because they were intentionally homeless – an increase of 15 per cent on the same time last year. These were people in ‘priority need’ – those with young children, or households with older or vulnerable people – but, because they became homeless due to something they did or failed to do, they did not qualify to be supported into housing by the council. 

The final group is the most worrying. Over 5,100 households were recognised as being homeless through no fault of their own, but were not given help because they didn’t have a ‘priority need’. This was the reality for nearly 1 in 5 (18 per cent) of those asking for help, and an increase of 10 per cent on the number last year. 

Many are single people who just don’t have anywhere else to go, or who may face challenges with health or life-skills but aren’t considered ‘vulnerable enough’ to be housed.  In this situation, the only alternative for many is sofa-surfing, squatting, or sleeping rough. 

Above all else, these figures highlight the urgent need to tackle the housing crisis in England and ensure there is a good range of housing options that are affordable to all. Until then, we need better regulation in the private rented sector to target unscrupulous landlords who put quick profit before their tenants’ wellbeing.  

Councils are already giving advice about finding a better home to all those who are turned away. They may try to help with Housing Benefit problems or give debt advice, or help people to stay in their own home.  We need more targeted, good quality help that stops people from losing their homes, even amongst increasing pressures on councils, and better advice and support if they do become homeless. 

But unless we can get better at preventing homelessness in the first place, we will keep seeing the same figures time and again – 1 in 2 people turned away.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of The Information Daily, its parent company or any associated businesses.

Comments

Latest

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are more likely to employ low skilled workers and others from disadvantaged…

Scientists have discovered four species of Brazilian insect where the female possesses a penis and the males possess…

Stimulating the spine with an electrical current during physical therapy could in the future help people paralysed…

An Earth-sized planet has been found in the habitable zone of its star for the first time, according to sensational…

HC2014

Middle-aged people who experienced bullying in childhood and early adolescence disproportionately report suicidal…

An organic soil frozen at the bottom of the Greenland Ice Sheet has been discovered after 2.7 million years, offering…

This year's annual education conference from UK teachers' union NASUWT is set to pull apart four years of Michael…

The government favours potentially ineffective regulation of shale gas extraction over a real exploration of its…

HC2014

A breast cancer sub-type which is notoriously hard to detect has now been specifically associated with a genetic variant.

The Science Capital Birmingham event brings data and business experts together to discuss exploiting the commercial…

A new form of MRI scan that can show ‘brown fat’ in a living person could help in the development…

A severe eye infection called microbial keratitis can be caused by bacteria that survive for four hours in lens solution.