Binoculars

Unlicensed private investigation to become a criminal offence

By: Information Daily Staff Writer
Published: Wednesday, July 31, 2013 - 13:43 GMT Jump to Comments

Operating as an unlicensed private investigator will become a criminal offence, the Home Secretary Theresa May has announced.

The current system, which is not regulated, allows anyone to work as a private investigator, regardless of their skills, experience or criminal convictions.

The new regulations, according to the Home Office, will thwart the high risk of rogue investigators unlawfully infringing on an individual’s privacy.

“It is vital we have proper regulation of private investigators to ensure rigorous standards in this sector and the respect of individuals’ rights to privacy”, said the Home Secretary.

The maximum penalty for working as an unlicense private investigator or supplying unlicensed investigators will be a fine of up to £5,000 and up to six months in prison.

May said: “Anyone with a criminal conviction for data protection offences can expect to have their application for a licence refused. Journalists will be excluded from regulation to allow them to carry out legitimate investigations in the public interest".

Licences will be granted by the Security Industry Authority when an applicant has completed training, achieved the appropriate qualification, confirmed their identity and undergone a criminal check.

The regulations will be introduced next year.

If you enjoyed reading the story, register HERE to receive daily email alerts on public policy and public sector service delivery. Follow us @TheInfoDaily.

Comments

Latest

Children need educating for the future since that is where they are headed. Education ministers with a nostalgic…

Ever changing and increasingly challenging demands on civic leaders will not be met unless we pause the storytelling…

VIDEO: Emer Coleman challenges the large systems integrators holding lengthy IT contracts with local authorities…

Out of hours provision is disjointed, confuses the public and must change. CCGs must face the challenges of reducing…

60 percent of millennials surveyed expect a consistent experience from brands, whether online, in store or via phone.

NHS organisations are more likely to buy something innovative that helps medical professionals do their job, rather…

Ian Jones talking about Leeds community driven open data projects at the Making a Difference With Data (MADwDATA)…

Technology may threaten jobs, but by resisting the advances promised by new technologies we run the risk of missing…

Do you do digital? Take the test

The Information Daily is collaborating with Socitm to research organisations' commitment to and capability for a digital future.

Take the test

View Results

If you have already taken the test, you may view the latest detailed results by entering your email address below


Headline results so far: Results from 103 users

Corporate commitment: 47%
0%
100%
50%
Digital capability: 53%
0%
100%
50%

CCGs were invited to express a level of interest in co-commissioning. 196 of England’s 211 Clinical Commissioning…

Most of us read about the recent cyber-attack suffered by eBay when the auction site was forced to request that…

Public Health England have drawn together advanced data tools to better their diagnosis and surveillance of life-threatening…

Phil Neal discusses the findings of a new survey which reveals that challenges remain for children’s services…