Environment: Free TV & Computer Recycling Scheme starts in South Australia

By: Information Daily Staff Writer
Published: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 - 08:59 GMT Jump to Comments

The National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme begins in South Australia today with the start of free recycling services in Adelaide.

Senator Don Farrell, Parliamentary Secretary for Sustainability and Urban Water, visited the Beverley Waste and Recycling Centre to launch the new service, which enables South Australian householders and small businesses to drop off unwanted TVs and computer products for recycling free of charge.

“The introduction of services in Adelaide is another important milestone for the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme, which was made possible by the Gillard Government’s landmark Product Stewardship legislation,” Senator Farrell said.

“People dropping off their unwanted televisions and computers as part of the scheme can do so safe in the knowledge that these products will be recycled in an environmentally friendly way.

“Hazardous materials including lead, mercury and zinc will be prevented from entering the environment through landfill and valuable non-renewable resources, including gold and other precious metals will be recovered for reuse.

From today, DHL Supply Chain will operate a free, ongoing recycling service at the Beverley Waste and Recycling Centre for televisions, computers, and computer products such as printers, keyboards, mice and hard drives. Other electronic waste, such as mobile phones, is already covered by schemes like the voluntary recycling scheme MobileMuster.

This is the first of several services that will be set up in Adelaide and across the State over the next 18 months, so South Australians can hold on to their unwanted televisions and computer products until a service is available nearby.

The Beverley Waste and Recycling Centre is likely to be very busy in the first few weeks. Residents are encouraged to hold on to their items for a while longer to avoid long queues, especially on weekends. The free recycling service is a permanent arrangement so there is no need to rush.

Services under the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme will be progressively rolled out across Australia, boosting television and computer recycling rates to 30 per cent in 2012-13 and 80 per cent by 2021-22, providing a long-term solution to television and computer waste.

Senator Farrell said this service builds on the ongoing work of the South Australian Government and local councils to provide recycling alternatives for televisions and computers.

“With three approved providers operating under the Scheme - including DHL Supply Chain, which is operating this service - there will be more recycling options for people in South Australia and new opportunities for the recycling sector.”

The City of Charles Sturt Council already provides a free drop off service for their residents at the Beverly site. However, the new service can be used by all residents and will be funded by industry, instead of local and state government.

The National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme is funded and implemented by the television and computer industry and regulated by the Australian Government under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 and the Product Stewardship (Televisions and Computers) Regulations 2011.

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